Friday, December 20, 2013
sunlight-on-skin:

☂ Dark Network ☂

sunlight-on-skin:

☂ Dark Network ☂

actegratuit:

Artem Rhads Cheboha

distortus:

The Codex Gigas was once considered the eighth wonder of the world; the book is three feet long and weighs a hundred and sixty-five pounds. It has 600 pages which, contrary to legend, are made from calf skins, not donkey skins.
The Codex Gigas includes a combination of texts found nowhere else. In addition to the full text of the Latin bible, the book contains herbals, history books, cures for dangerous illnesses, texts caring for the soul, medical formulas for treating illnesses and diseases, conjurations, and even solutions to problems such as finding a thief.
The book got the nickname of The Devil’s Bible because it is the only bible to include such a large portrait of the devil. Half-clothed in royal ermine; half man, half beast; with claws, cloven hooves, and a huge serpentine red tongue, the drawing shows Satan walled up in a cell alone rather than loosed in Hell. Immediately across from the devil is a portrait of the Kingdom of Heaven, creating an interesting contrast [see here].
According to the Kungl Biblioteket, legend had it that the book was written by a monk condemned to be walled up alive. To spare his life, he promised his bishop that he would create the most wonderful book the world had ever seen, including the text of the Bible and the sum of all human knowledge up to that point in time – and he would do it in one night.
In order to accomplish this impossible task, he sold his soul to the devil. The legend is actually based on a misinterpretation of the word “inclusus” as the punishment of being walled up alive, but which actually refers to a monk choosing to live in a solitary cell away from the others.
Despite the legend involving the devil, in the time of the inquisition, this codex was kept by the monastery and studied by many scholars to this day.

distortus:

The Codex Gigas was once considered the eighth wonder of the world; the book is three feet long and weighs a hundred and sixty-five pounds. It has 600 pages which, contrary to legend, are made from calf skins, not donkey skins.

The Codex Gigas includes a combination of texts found nowhere else. In addition to the full text of the Latin bible, the book contains herbals, history books, cures for dangerous illnesses, texts caring for the soul, medical formulas for treating illnesses and diseases, conjurations, and even solutions to problems such as finding a thief.

The book got the nickname of The Devil’s Bible because it is the only bible to include such a large portrait of the devil. Half-clothed in royal ermine; half man, half beast; with claws, cloven hooves, and a huge serpentine red tongue, the drawing shows Satan walled up in a cell alone rather than loosed in Hell. Immediately across from the devil is a portrait of the Kingdom of Heaven, creating an interesting contrast [see here].

According to the Kungl Biblioteket, legend had it that the book was written by a monk condemned to be walled up alive. To spare his life, he promised his bishop that he would create the most wonderful book the world had ever seen, including the text of the Bible and the sum of all human knowledge up to that point in time – and he would do it in one night.

In order to accomplish this impossible task, he sold his soul to the devil. The legend is actually based on a misinterpretation of the word “inclusus” as the punishment of being walled up alive, but which actually refers to a monk choosing to live in a solitary cell away from the others.

Despite the legend involving the devil, in the time of the inquisition, this codex was kept by the monastery and studied by many scholars to this day.

clarabacouart:

JACKADAW is

the story of an omnibenevolent forest dog deity

who guides a young girl called Willow

through life’s hardships.

Jackadaw is the ruler of a parallel forest-filled world inhabited by

fantastical anthropomorphized demigods.

The novel’s message is to transfer self-destructive feelings

into something constructive.

 ★ Read Jackadaw here. ★

CLARA BACOU ART

They say the wolf bestows its happy spirit to help people. Women who obtain this spirit become skilled in creative endeavors and experience a strengthening of the senses. I would like to think there is some truth to this in my own life. Judi Rideout (via wolveswolves)

(Source: 500px.com)

aberrantbeauty:

Joost Lagerweij

aberrantbeauty:

Joost Lagerweij

"Sometimes I really want to fuck ALL the girls on tumblr and make them feel better." -my friend, Erich, semi-drunkenly lamenting that so many beautiful girls seem to think no one will ever love them because of their cutting scars.

Thursday, September 5, 2013

Anonymous said: What would you say is the youngest age to safely start wearing corsets?

lace-me-tighter:

No younger than sixteen for minimum wear, and absolutely no waist training before eighteen.

If a corset fits properly and is being worn in a safe, moderate way (laced tightly enough to give back support without compressing the ribs or internal organs), it is safe to wear even in childhood. While it would be impractical for a child or adolescent (or an adult, for that matter) to wear a corset for play or athletic activities, unless they have a back problem that requires the support, wearing a corset that fits them properly for sedentary activities would not be in any way unsafe. In fact, considering the posture that backpacks and sitting all day in bad chairs can cause in students, wearing a firmly-laced corset would probably be more helpful than harmful to their spine and back muscles in general. 

If I had been able to get a corset when I was in high school, I wouldn’t have had to spend years in agonizing back pain. This sort of ignorance makes me sick.

Oh, and a proper age to begin waist training would be whenever you have reached your adult height. For some people that’s eighteen, for many it’s younger, or even older. Eighteen is not the magical age at which all adult things become safe. This blogger is just throwing it out because no one is allowed to get mad at you if you use “not until you’re 18 or you will be in danger" as a general guideline these days, whether it’s actually true or not. 

I suppose the difference here is that I am thinking of corsets as supportive garments built and worn for practical purposes, rather than some sort of retro body-squishing kink that might corrupt your developing body, even worn minimally, if you’re under 16.